March for Science Statement on the FY17 Omnibus Bill

Today, with the release of the FY17 Omnibus Bill, we were heartened to see that the Congress has listened to advocates for science -- like those who participated in the March -- and protected many of the important programs that have recently come under fire.

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Now That We Have Marched for Science, What’s Next for Science Advocacy?

Now That We Have Marched for Science, What’s Next for Science Advocacy?

This post is co-written by Christin Glorioso, president of Academics for the Future of Science (AFS); and Gary McDowell, executive director of The Future of Research (FoR).

It is an unprecedented time for science enthusiasm. Last fall, science was barely mentioned in the election. But yesterday, April 22nd, thousands of people marched for science all over the world. But there is still one recurring anxiety - what now? We don’t want to go the way of other grassroots movements by having all this enthusiasm fizzle and not be directed.

Academics for the Future of Science (AFS) and Future of Research (FoR) are two grassroots science policy non-profit organizations run by early-career scientists. We are offering some easy ways to continue to bring more science and evidence-based policy into the world post March:

  1. Sign up for science advocacy...

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Marching for (Climate) Science - Words from Partners

Below, hear from some of our March for Science partners - the NYU Climate Working Group, Cool Effect, the Union of Concerned Scientists, the American Association of University Professors, and 350.org - about why they march both for science and in support of the consensus on climate change.

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Introducing the "People for Science" Project

One of the most amazing things to come out of the March for Science has been the stories. Stories of scientists. Stories of teachers. Stories of survivors. We often forget that it's people who drive forward, apply, and benefit from science and the incredible, independent campaigns run by Satellite Marches around the world put the human face on science that it needs.

March for Science is collecting these images and stories to create a scrapbook of the people who do, love, and teach science

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Supporting Professional Advocacy Societies

Regardless of your own background, the success of societies that promote women, underrepresented minorities, and/or marginalized groups in STE(A)M is a success for everyone. As the world continues to be shaped by science and technology, it's more essential than ever that we ensure those making critical decisions and discoveries are representative of their full community. To make that happen, anyone can do three things: (1) listen to needs, (2) give your time and/or share the message, and (3) donate or support the organization.

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Statement on the Reported Assault of Reverend Yearwood

We are deeply disturbed by the reported assault against Rev. Yearwood, President and CEO of the Hip Hop Caucus, on his way to the #MarchforScience in Washington, DC on Saturday.

We call on relevant law enforcement authorities to take appropriate steps to investigate the situation and undertake necessary reforms.

We must also acknowledge that the risks of participating in public demonstrations are not the same for all marchers, and marchers who come from historically marginalized groups may face risks that are not equally shared by others. The March for Science has and will continue to cultivate resources that support all marchers, and address the risks communities within our movement face.

We are grateful to Rev. Yearwood for his participation in the March, and we are proud to stand with Rev. Yearwood and the Hip Hop Caucus. You can read Rev. Yearwood's full account here: Marching For Climate While Black. 

 

"I Marched For Science" - Introducing A Week of Action

In the week following the March for Science (April 23-29), we will promote daily actions that serve our mission for supporters around the world to engage in together. This Week of Action will continue the momentum from the march and promote sustained, coordinated science advocacy.

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"I Marched For Science"

Civic engagement is vital for shaping a future in which science is fully integrated into public life and policy. On April 22, you marched for science. Now, tell your friends, communities, colleagues, and leaders why.

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March for Science North Pole Edition

March for Science North Pole Edition

Today thousands of science supporters, all over the world, March for Science. They even march at the North Pole! This piece, which was first published on 2Degrees, is from Bernice Notenboom who is currently performing research at the North Pole.

"During the last three weeks I have supported scientists by marching to the North Pole, an extreme expedition of 224 km facing -40°C temperatures while still collecting data on the ice to support NASA/ESA and arctic scientists...

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Everyone Can Advocate for Science: Tips for Immigrants Supporting Science

Everyone Can Advocate for Science: Tips for Immigrants Supporting Science

This piece is by Gary McDowell the executive director of Future of Research covers how immigrants on a visa can advocate for science. 

Many scientists are looking to become more politically engaged or to advocate—whether it be through marching for science, or contacting elected representatives and attending town halls. As someone here on a Green Card, who likes to actively engage and wants to advocate, I wondered what I can and cannot do in the US...

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Why Scientists Care so Much About Gnats, Weeds, and Brewer’s Yeast

Why Scientists Care so Much About Gnats, Weeds, and Brewer’s Yeast

This post is by Nicole Haloupek and Cristy Gelling on behalf of the Genetics Society of America. The road from a discovery to its impact on society is rarely straight. Few of the scientists in these stories could have predicted how their work might one day be applied. Today’s investment in some seemingly obscure, weird quirk of a model organism may tomorrow surprise us with a wealth of new possibilities. 

"In the late 1970s, a pair of biologists chatted over a microscope, working together to examine some mutant fruit fly embryos. The mutants in view were stumpier and spikier than usual; the scientists agreed these defects were worth further study. As they focused on their tiny subjects, they could not have known that this moment would eventually lead to...

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Cool Effect’s Carbon Reduction Projects Save Lives Thanks to Sound Science and Simple Technology

Cool Effect’s Carbon Reduction Projects Save Lives Thanks to Sound Science and Simple Technology

This post is from Cool Effect, a partner of March for Science. Cool Effect can help you offset the carbon associated with your March for Science travel.

"There are a ton of reasons why we should save the planet from climate change. And, thanks to science, there are solutions that you can access. My husband and I have reduced one million verified tonnes of CO2 and to share our experience with you, we created Cool Effect.

Our story began 13 years ago in a little schoolroom medical clinic in the mountains of rural Honduras..

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Why Former U.S Chief Data Scientist, D.J. Patil, Is Marching and You Should Too

Why Former U.S Chief Data Scientist, D.J. Patil, Is Marching and You Should Too

A letter from D.J. Patil, former U.S. Chief Data Scientist:

"On April 22 I’ll be joining fellow Americans from around the country to show our support for science. In addition to Washington, DC, there are more than 500 marches planned all around the world! I’ll be speaking and marching at our hometown march in San Francisco alongside with Mythbusters’ Adam Savage and many other great scientists.

Why am I and my family coming out to march for science?...

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#AmericanSTEAM - Profile of an American Scientist: Dr. Zafir Buraei

#AmericanSTEAM - Profile of an American Scientist: Dr. Zafir Buraei

Dr. Zafir Buraei is a neuroscientist at PACE University. He is pictured here with his partner at the Bronx Botanical Garden, 2017. This is what he has to say:

"After the Iran invasion of Kuwait we came to Serbia, and I did high school there and I did college there. In college it became very clear to me that if you want to become anybody in science you have to spend some time in the US. Everybody was talking about the US - that it’s an environment that has to be experienced if you are to advance...

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There Will Be No Jobs on a Dead Planet.

There Will Be No Jobs on a Dead Planet.

Our oceans are dynamic ecosystems. But the changes happening now, both large and small, are damaging our oceans, and with that our lives and livelihoods. We are all unmistakable contributors to these changes. And their devastating effects are being witnessed first hand by those of us who work on the water on a daily basis. Whether it’s rising water temperatures driving fish populations northward or more frequent extreme weather events, it is clear that we are now on the front line of a climate crisis that has arrived a hundred years earlier than anticipated.

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