Marching for (Climate) Science - Words from Partners

Below, hear from some of our March for Science partners - the NYU Climate Working Group, Cool Effect, the Union of Concerned Scientists, the American Association of University Professors, and 350.org - about why they march both for science and in support of the consensus on climate change.

Read More

Introducing the "People for Science" Project

One of the most amazing things to come out of the March for Science has been the stories. Stories of scientists. Stories of teachers. Stories of survivors. We often forget that it's people who drive forward, apply, and benefit from science and the incredible, independent campaigns run by Satellite Marches around the world put the human face on science that it needs.

March for Science is collecting these images and stories to create a scrapbook of the people who do, love, and teach science

Read More

Supporting Professional Advocacy Societies

Regardless of your own background, the success of societies that promote women, underrepresented minorities, and/or marginalized groups in STE(A)M is a success for everyone. As the world continues to be shaped by science and technology, it's more essential than ever that we ensure those making critical decisions and discoveries are representative of their full community. To make that happen, anyone can do three things: (1) listen to needs, (2) give your time and/or share the message, and (3) donate or support the organization.

Read More

Statement on the Reported Assault of Reverend Yearwood

We are deeply disturbed by the reported assault against Rev. Yearwood, President and CEO of the Hip Hop Caucus, on his way to the #MarchforScience in Washington, DC on Saturday.

We call on relevant law enforcement authorities to take appropriate steps to investigate the situation and undertake necessary reforms.

We must also acknowledge that the risks of participating in public demonstrations are not the same for all marchers, and marchers who come from historically marginalized groups may face risks that are not equally shared by others. The March for Science has and will continue to cultivate resources that support all marchers, and address the risks communities within our movement face.

We are grateful to Rev. Yearwood for his participation in the March, and we are proud to stand with Rev. Yearwood and the Hip Hop Caucus. You can read Rev. Yearwood's full account here: Marching For Climate While Black. 

 

"I Marched For Science" - Introducing A Week of Action

The March is just the beginning. Join the movement.

In the week following the March for Science (April 23-29), we will promote daily actions that serve our mission for supporters around the world to engage in together. This Week of Action will continue the momentum from the march and promote sustained, coordinated science advocacy.

The Week of Action is just one more step toward building a global movement that champions science for the common good by growing the network of local chapters around the world and partnering organizations, providing tools and sharing resources, and encouraging science and civic literacy outreach efforts. Together, we will #keepmarching to defend and strengthen the role of science in society to better serve all of our communities. 

The Week of Action starts today. You can dive into the details of each day here, and watch as our homepage changes every day as new featured actions go live. Week we will be engaging with our friends, communities, institutions, and leaders to tell them why we marched on April 22. 

Below is an overview so you can begin planning your next steps! Beneath the daily schedule, don't miss our "I Marched For Science" message - the framework for the outreach we'll be doing to our leaders from the local to global levels in the coming days. For US-based marchers, we will provide a simple tool that will allow you to locate and contact your officials, but we want everyone around the world to participate in this important form of outreach!

SUNDAY • Science Engages
#KEEPMARCHING
IMPACT
Join the movement! Get a friend to sign up, sign your satellite up to join the network and read our open letter.

EXPLORE
Listen in on the live post-march podcast hosted by taste of science festival at the Carnegie Institute.

ADVOCATE
Read and share "I Marched For Science," which includes a statement on the importance of civic engagement.


MONDAY • Science Discovers
#KIDSCIENTISTS
IMPACT
Support local outreach by learning how to bring scientists into community spaces. Our main page has all kinds of resources right at your fingertips!

EXPLORE
Science Game night: learn about science with friends or family via evidence- and science-based games.

ADVOCATE
Contact friends, colleagues, neighbors and family members about the importance of advocating for scientific institutions and science-based policies by sharing the Week of Action link on social media and encouraging them to engage their elected officials. #NoSidesInScience


TUESDAY • Science Empowers
#EVERYDAYSCIENCE
IMPACT

Register to vote and sign the Environmental Voter Pledge.

EXPLORE
Learn how to decrease your carbon footprint and support a Cool Effect project.

ADVOCATE
Contact the President of the General Assembly of the United Nations with a postcard that states why you marched for science and why he should support scientific institutions and science-based policies.
 


WEDNESDAY • Science Creates
#STEAM #CITSCI
IMPACT
Participate in a large scale Citizen Science project through SciStarter or a local organization.

EXPLORE
Explore STEAM programs and learn how you can support or get involved.

ADVOCATE
Contact the President of the United States with a postcard that states why you marched for science and why they should support scientific institutions and science-based policies. (Non-US marchers, look out for more information on how to contact your executive branch!)


THURSDAY • Science Communicates
#SCICOMM #SHAREYOURSCIENCE
IMPACT
Join the launch of The People’s Science’s “The Field”: a direct interface between scientists and public.

EXPLORE
Share your science story through Story Collider and learn how to spot common misrepresentations of science in the media.

ADVOCATE
Contact your federal officials (Congressperson, Senators) with a MFS postcard that states why you marched for science and why they should support scientific institutions and science-based policies. (Non-US marchers, look out for more information on how to contact your federal legislators!)


FRIDAY • Science Advocates
#FUTUREOFSCIENCE
IMPACT
Learn about and support one of the national or local professional societies committed to advocating for underrepresented communities in STEM.

EXPLORE
Learn about and contribute to the collaborative People for Science and “I Am A Scientist” campaign to break stereotypes about and by scientists.

ADVOCATE
Contact your governor with a MFS postcard that states why you marched for science and why they should support scientific institutions and science-based policies.(Non-US marchers, look out for more information on how to participate!)


SATURDAY • Science Connects
#SCIENCEINACTION
IMPACT
Attend the People’s Climate March (if applicable).

EXPLORE
Support your local science community: go to a science institution, community garden, or meeting of a local science-related group (e.g. groups focused on food, conservation, stargazing, environmental clean-up, etc.).

ADVOCATE
Contact your local officials with a MFS postcard that states why you marched for science and why they should support scientific institutions and science-based policies. (Non-US marchers, look out for more information on how to participate!)


 "I Marched For Science" - Speaking to Our Leaders

On April 22, we gathered in more than 600 places around the world to voice and demonstrate our support for science and the fundamental role it plays in serving and improving our society through informed policy. We came from all educational backgrounds, from a rich diversity of human experiences, and from nations around the world: the March for Science reached from the Global South to the North Pole.

This week, we mobilize through a “Week of Action.” We contact our elected officials, support science institutions in our communities, and hold our leaders in society and science accountable to the highest standards of honesty, integrity and fairness. And we work to bring science and the benefits of scientific research to those who need it most. 

In the coming days, we ask our leaders to listen to us as we talk to them about the value of science and tell them why we marched. We ask them to support priorities such as:

  • Sustaining and strengthening scientific integrity
  • Using the best-available science to make policy and regulatory decisions
  • Investing in and encouraging research and development in the public sector, and incentivizing investment in research and development in the private sector
  • Supporting broad participation and access to diverse communities' talents and perspectives
  • Facilitating open communication and collaboration between scientists and the broader public
  • Encouraging scientists to take an active role in public life and policy
  • Creating an environment that fosters a vibrant and diverse international scientific community
  • Building capacity for science education that draws on best-available knowledge and instructs students in scientific practices

United as one movement, and with the support of our leaders, we can take a step forward into a future where science can do its job: protecting and serving the health of our communities, the safety of our families, the education of our children, the foundation of our economy, the freedom of our imaginations, and the future we all want to live in and preserve for coming generations.

We urge our leaders to use the powers of their offices to protect and uplift the role of science in serving society.

 

"I Marched For Science"

Civic engagement is vital for shaping a future in which science is fully integrated into public life and policy. On April 22, you marched for science. Now, tell your friends, communities, colleagues, and leaders why.

Read More
March for Science North Pole Edition

March for Science North Pole Edition

Today thousands of science supporters, all over the world, March for Science. They even march at the North Pole! This piece, which was first published on 2Degrees, is from Bernice Notenboom who is currently performing research at the North Pole.

"During the last three weeks I have supported scientists by marching to the North Pole, an extreme expedition of 224 km facing -40°C temperatures while still collecting data on the ice to support NASA/ESA and arctic scientists...

Read More
Everyone Can Advocate for Science: Tips for Immigrants Supporting Science

Everyone Can Advocate for Science: Tips for Immigrants Supporting Science

This piece is by Gary McDowell the executive director of Future of Research covers how immigrants on a visa can advocate for science. 

Many scientists are looking to become more politically engaged or to advocate—whether it be through marching for science, or contacting elected representatives and attending town halls. As someone here on a Green Card, who likes to actively engage and wants to advocate, I wondered what I can and cannot do in the US...

Read More
Why Scientists Care so Much About Gnats, Weeds, and Brewer’s Yeast

Why Scientists Care so Much About Gnats, Weeds, and Brewer’s Yeast

This post is by Nicole Haloupek and Cristy Gelling on behalf of the Genetics Society of America. The road from a discovery to its impact on society is rarely straight. Few of the scientists in these stories could have predicted how their work might one day be applied. Today’s investment in some seemingly obscure, weird quirk of a model organism may tomorrow surprise us with a wealth of new possibilities. 

"In the late 1970s, a pair of biologists chatted over a microscope, working together to examine some mutant fruit fly embryos. The mutants in view were stumpier and spikier than usual; the scientists agreed these defects were worth further study. As they focused on their tiny subjects, they could not have known that this moment would eventually lead to...

Read More
Cool Effect’s Carbon Reduction Projects Save Lives Thanks to Sound Science and Simple Technology

Cool Effect’s Carbon Reduction Projects Save Lives Thanks to Sound Science and Simple Technology

This post is from Cool Effect, a partner of March for Science. Cool Effect can help you offset the carbon associated with your March for Science travel.

"There are a ton of reasons why we should save the planet from climate change. And, thanks to science, there are solutions that you can access. My husband and I have reduced one million verified tonnes of CO2 and to share our experience with you, we created Cool Effect.

Our story began 13 years ago in a little schoolroom medical clinic in the mountains of rural Honduras..

Read More
Why Former U.S Chief Data Scientist, D.J. Patil, Is Marching and You Should Too

Why Former U.S Chief Data Scientist, D.J. Patil, Is Marching and You Should Too

A letter from D.J. Patil, former U.S. Chief Data Scientist:

"On April 22 I’ll be joining fellow Americans from around the country to show our support for science. In addition to Washington, DC, there are more than 500 marches planned all around the world! I’ll be speaking and marching at our hometown march in San Francisco alongside with Mythbusters’ Adam Savage and many other great scientists.

Why am I and my family coming out to march for science?...

Read More
#AmericanSTEAM - Profile of an American Scientist: Dr. Zafir Buraei

#AmericanSTEAM - Profile of an American Scientist: Dr. Zafir Buraei

Dr. Zafir Buraei is a neuroscientist at PACE University. He is pictured here with his partner at the Bronx Botanical Garden, 2017. This is what he has to say:

"After the Iran invasion of Kuwait we came to Serbia, and I did high school there and I did college there. In college it became very clear to me that if you want to become anybody in science you have to spend some time in the US. Everybody was talking about the US - that it’s an environment that has to be experienced if you are to advance...

Read More
There Will Be No Jobs on a Dead Planet.

There Will Be No Jobs on a Dead Planet.

Our oceans are dynamic ecosystems. But the changes happening now, both large and small, are damaging our oceans, and with that our lives and livelihoods. We are all unmistakable contributors to these changes. And their devastating effects are being witnessed first hand by those of us who work on the water on a daily basis. Whether it’s rising water temperatures driving fish populations northward or more frequent extreme weather events, it is clear that we are now on the front line of a climate crisis that has arrived a hundred years earlier than anticipated.

Read More
Building A Lab With A Wedding Registry

Building A Lab With A Wedding Registry

I grew up in a rural village in Kenya and went through local elementary and public high school. I didn’t experience science in a laboratory setting until late in high school. Even then, much of the science I was exposed to was literature oriented, and only designed to allow me and the rest of the students to acquire the knowledge we needed to pass the practical exams. Science was never practical nor hands on; therefore, our curiosity was silenced. They say that every child is a natural scientist, but sadly, for me and many other children, that innate scientist ability was never encouraged or nurtured. As a result, I did not see myself ever becoming a scientist.

Read More
Reflecting on Hope for Life in the Anthropocene

Reflecting on Hope for Life in the Anthropocene

Springtime is a welcome reprieve from a prolonged cold winter. It is a time of reawakening when all kinds of species become impatient to get on with their business of living. We hear the trill of mating frogs, see leaves unfurl from their quiescent buds, and behold forest floors and fields unfold rich color from a dizzying variety of blossoming wildflowers. The energetic pace of life is palpable. It is only fitting, then, that we dedicate one spring day each year – Earth Day – to commemorate the amazing variety of life on this planet, and to take stock of the human enterprise and reflect on how our behavior toward nature is influencing its sustainability.

Read More
Useful Steps for Marching (And Other Active) Scientists

Useful Steps for Marching (And Other Active) Scientists

Yes, you know that the Science March’s mission is a simple call to support publicly communicated scientific research and evidence-based policies. But contrary to the March’s stated aims, some still believe that the March is a partisan statement that might alienate the very people whom you are calling. At CSLDF, we have seen well-meaning scientists and academics experience problems after advocating for science (e.g., here) or taking a personal political stance (e.g., here or here). What’s a scientist to do?

Don’t fret; prep. If you are one of the many scientists considering participating in the March for Science or engaging in other science-related activism, we are here to arm you with tools that will help you avoid ending up in political crosshairs.

Read More
Ways Science Has Affected My Life: An Essay By An 8th Grader

Ways Science Has Affected My Life: An Essay By An 8th Grader

This piece was written by Brianna Wildermuth, an eighth-grade student from South Dakota.

"Science has done so many things for me in my life. It has made cars that I use daily and the social technology that I live off of. Science has told me that it isn’t my heavy shoes that are keeping me on the Earth, it is the gravity of our planet. Extraordinary things have been done with science that affect myself and society every day, but I think the largest impact science has made on me comes from the health field.

When I was twelve years old...

Read More
How to Fight the War on Science and Win

How to Fight the War on Science and Win

The latest battle in the War on Science has shifted into high gear.

Attacks on science might sound trivial compared to the larger political upheaval happening in America today, but make no mistake: the War on Science is going to affect you, whether you are a scientist or not.

In fact, it’s going to affect everything — ranging from the safety of the food we eat, the water we drink, and the air we breathe. It will affect the kinds of diseases we get and the medicines we use. It will dictate what our kids are taught in school, what is discussed in the news, and what is debated in Congress. It will affect the jobs we have, and what powers our economy.

Read More

Science Game Night

Gamification is an increasingly popular strategy for learning. While its tangible benefits may not be well established by researchers, it certainly can't hurt to try. Whether you're aiming to pull off a DIY impromptu game night tonight or just getting the ball rolling on planning one soon, we've put together a list of science-inspired games for you to check out!

SCIENCE TRADING CARDS
Ages: 8+
Players: 2+

Phylo is a crowd-sourced, biodiversity-themed card game that anyone can order at a revenue-neutral price or download and print at home for free. There are over 1000 trading cards, as well as a few specialty decks with their own sets of rules. Genetics Society of America (GSA) created a version focused on model organisms and experiments with cards that invites anyone to experience a taste of what its like to be a researcher. Protip: you can expand the game by adding your own cards!


BRAIN GAME
Ages: 8+
Players: 2-4

The Stroop Effect refers to a phenomenon that demonstrates the challenge your brain faces when reconciling competing signals, such as naming the color of the word "blue" when its written in red. "Stroop" turns this concept into a game, testing your skills and demonstrating the ways the brain does - and doesn't - work.


CHEMISTRY IN ACTION
Ages: 13+
Players: 2-5

Take on the role of the director of a lab who is trying to make a particular chemical compound before their rivals. "Compounded" is a chemistry-inspired board game that incorporates both educational elements - like empirical formulas and atomic arrangements - with game-changing characteristics like how the volatility of certain compounds changes over time. 


WOMEN IN SCIENCE
Ages: 7+
Players: 2+

In 2015, Luana Games ran a successful Indiegogo campaign to fund the creation of an easy-to-play card game featuring the stories of women in science throughout history. The game can be downloaded and printed, purchased online, or playing virtually. You can also read the biographies of featured women - such as Euphemia Haynes and Grace Hopper - on the game's website.


BEGINNER'S HACK-A-THON
Ages: 8+
Players: 1+

MIT's Scratch is a free online platform where anyone can learn to program using a simple language. Though it was designed for kids, it's a great way for adults to learn the basics of coding in a world increasingly shaped by computers. Co-create an animation with your kids, setup a competition to tell the best visual science story with friends, or just settle in and learn something new on your own.

 

Do you have any favorite science-inspired games? Tell us with #MarchforScience!